DOBIE DICHOS

Dobie Dichos

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Date: Nov 03, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM
Cost: $5.00 - $15.00
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7th annual Dobie Dichos:

Campfires, Chili con Carne, and the Words of

J. Frank Dobie

"Any tale belongs to whoever can best tell it!" J.F.D.

Presented by George West Storyfest Association, Inc., this event honors Live Oak County’s most famous son, J. Frank Dobie, to celebrate Dobie’s works and contributions to literature, folklore, and storytelling.

Texas writers/authors and storytellers read from or tell stories from the works of J. Frank Dobie under the stars on the grounds of the Historic Oakville Jail, located on IH37 in Live Oak County. The meal consists of a bowl of chili, pan de campo, a bottle of water, and dessert. Beer is available for purchase.

“If Dobie had left instructions in his will, the Dobie Dichos readings would be exactly as they are now. Stories told around a countryside campfire, friends eating barbecue and feeling blessed by the stars. Listen, our literary father's clapping.” -- Nan Cuba, author / poet

“Dobie Dichos is the next best thing to hearing Dobie tell his stories around a campfire.” - Robert Flynn, author


"Attending the magical DOBIE DICHOS evening with some of my Austin students and a San Antonio poet friend was one of the literary highlights of my recent years in Texas. All readings were stunning and transporting, and will change the way you think about J. Frank Dobie and our state forever. I urge everyone who can make it to attend!” - Naomi Shihab Nye, poet/ author


“One of the most luminous evenings of my life.” — Megan Hicks, storyteller


"Nothing like gathering 'round the firepit and having the words of the master flow over you!” — Mary Grace Ketner, storyteller


"Hard to resist a J. Frank Dobie love fest celebrated by fans with his words and in song around a bonfire in the bosom of his homeland." -- Claudia Maceo Sharp, Manager THE TWIG


“My courting days are long gone, but if I were a young man seeking to get a young woman interested in me, I couldn’t do better than to take her to Dobie Dichos -- no matter what the stage of the moon.” — Rick Casey, Reporter/ Journalist


"It's like going back in time. Just magic. Out there, seemingly in the middle of nowhere, listening to stories, it can slip your mind that the last century--or two--is actually over.” - Elizabeth Crook, author


"At Dobie Dichos we reclaim a timeless heritage as we gather round the campfire, swapping stories and summoning J. Frank Dobie's spirit out of the smoke.” — Steven L. Davis, author


“Texas folklore at its best!!" - Decee Cornish, folklorist


"Dobie Dichos is just the sort of gathering that J. Frank Dobie loved--especially with his Texas Folklore Society friends. With the campfire, the stories told around the fire, and a good bowl of chili, Dobie’s spirit is all around the Dobie Dichos gathering." -
Fran Vick


Proceeds to benefit restoration of the
Dobie-West Performing Arts Theatre, George West, TX

To learn more about the Historic Oakville Jail, visit their website at www.oakvillejail.com.

BYOLC: Bring Your Own Lawn Chair, eat a bowl of chili, and listen to top Texas authors and storytellers read from/tell stories from the works of noted folklorist J. Frank Dobie under the stars at the Historic Oakville Jail town square.


Participants for 2017

*Schedule Subject to Change without notice

William Jack Sibley ~ Master of Ceremonies

William Jack Sibley
William Jack Sibley 

William Jack Sibley ~ Master of Ceremonies and Co-Creator of Dobie Dichos, is a versatile writer. Sibley’s work has spanned from writing dialogue for television’s “The Guiding Light” to serving as a contributing editor at Andy Warhol’s, Interview Magazine, to seeing his work produced Off-Broadway and regionally. Author of over a dozen screenplays, two novels and numerous magazine, newspaper and journal articles, Sibley currently has two screenplays under option and is working on completing the third novel in his “Texas Trilogy”. In the Spring of 2015 Sibley was inducted into the Texas Institute of Letters.

(www.williamjacksibley.com)


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Cary Clack

Cary Clack
Cary Clack 

Cary Clack began writing a column for the San Antonio Express-News in 1994. For six years in a row, until his departure from the paper in 2011, Clack won the San Antonio Current’s Reader’s Choice poll for Best Columnist in the city and was also selected Best Columnist three years in a row in the San Antonio Magazine’s Editors’ and Readers’ Choice Poll.

Clack was born in San Antonio and received a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from St. Mary’s University in 1985. Clack worked as a Scholar-Intern at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, in Atlanta where he wrote CNN commentaries for Coretta Scott King.

Clack joined the Express-News Editorial Board before becoming a metro columnist. Clack was the first African-American on the editorial board of a San Antonio daily as well as the first African-American metro columnist for the paper.

Clack won the Dallas Press Club’s Katie Award for Best General Column and in 2008 he won the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library’s Arts and Letters Award for his writing. In 2009, Trinity University Press published a collection of his columns, “Clowns and Rats Scare Me.”

Immediately after leaving the Express-News, Clack signed on as communications director and senior adviser for the Joaquín Castro Congressional campaign. He worked for Castro's office until 2014, when he joined the staff of then-Interim Mayor Ivy Taylor. He is San Antonio Mayor Ivy Taylor's Director of Communications.

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Sarah Cortez

Sarah Cortez
Sarah Cortez 
Sarah Cortez is a Councilor of the Texas Institute of Letters and Fellow of the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Winner of the PEN Texas Literary Award, she has placed finalist in the Writers’ League of Texas awards and the PEN Southwest Poetry Awards. She has won the Southwest Book Award, multiple International Latino Book Awards, and the Skipping Stones Honor Award. She is a featured expert on the American Trigger Sports Network and both a Houston and Texas recent finalist for poet laureate.
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Dudley R. Dobie, Jr.

Dudley R. Dobie, Jr.
Dudley R. Dobie, Jr. 
A native of San Marcos, Texas, attorney Dudley Richard Dobie, Jr. (b. 1939) is the son of Deborah Galbreath and Dudley Richard Dobie, Sr., the cousin of folklorist J. Frank Dobie. From the University of Texas at Austin (UT), he earned a B.S. degree in 1960 and a J.D. in 1964. As of 2011, he is a partner in the law firm of Brorby, Crozier & Dobie, P.C., in Austin., specializing in patent litigation, technology licensing, and intellectual property. A member of the Governor’s Council on Science and Biotechnology and the Committee of Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer, Dobie has also served as chairman of the UT Executive Advisory Board on Technology and Intellectual Property, Senior Attorney in the Office of General Counsel of the UT System, director and vice president of the Central Texas Higher Education Authority, and president of the Houston and the Austin Intellectual Property Law Associations.
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Stephen Harrigan

Stephen Harrigan
Stephen Harrigan 

Stephen Harrigan was born in Oklahoma City in 1948 and has lived in Texas since the age of five, growing up in Abilene and Corpus Christi. He is a longtime writer for Texas Monthly, and his articles and essays have appeared in a wide range of other publications as well, including The Atlantic, Outside, The New York Times Magazine, Conde Nast Traveler, Audubon, Travel Holiday, Life, American History, National Geographic and Slate. He was a finalist for the 2015 National Magazine Awards for his commentary on film and television for Texas Monthly.

Harrigan is the author of ten books of fiction and non-fiction, including The Gates of the Alamo, which became a New York Times bestseller and Notable Book, and received a number of awards, including the TCU Texas Book Award, the Western Heritage Award from the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, and the Spur Award for Best Novel of the West. Remember Ben Clayton, was published by Knopf in 2011 and praised by Booklist as a "stunning work of art" and by The Wall Street Journal as a "a poignantly human monument to our history." Remember Ben Clayton also won a Spur Award, as well as the Jesse H. Jones Award from the Texas Institute of Letters and the James Fenimore Cooper Prize, given by the Society of American Historians for the best work of historical fiction. In the Spring of 2013, the University of Texas Press published a career-spanning volume of his essays, The Eye of the Mammoth , which reviewers called “masterful” (from a starred review in Publishers Weekly), “enchanting and irresistible” (the Dallas Morning News) and written with “acuity and matchless prose.”( Booklist). His latest novel is A Friend of Mr. Lincoln, a work of fiction centering on Abraham Lincoln’s early career as a lawyer and state legislator in Springfield, Illinois. A starred review in Publishers Weekly hailed the book as “superb” and, in the judgment of Pulitzer Prize winning historian Joseph J. Ellis, it is “historical fiction at its very best.”

Among the many movies Harrigan has written for television are HBO’s award-winning "The Last of His Tribe," starring Jon Voight and Graham Greene, and "King of Texas," a western retelling of Shakespeare’s King Lear for TNT, which starred Patrick Stewart, Marcia Gay Harden, and Roy Scheider. His most recent television production was "The Colt," an adaptation of a short story by the Nobel-prize winning author Mikhail Sholokhov, which aired on The Hallmark Channel. For his screenplay of "The Colt," Harrigan was nominated for a Writers Guild Award and the Humanitas Prize. Young Caesar, a feature adaptation of Conn Iggulden’s “Emperor” novels, which he co-wrote with William Broyles, Jr., is currently in development with Exclusive Media.

A 1971 graduate of the University of Texas, Harrigan lives in Austin, where he is a faculty fellow at UT’s James A. Michener Center for Writers and a writer-at-large for Texas Monthly. He is also a founding member of CAST (Capital Area Statues, Inc.) an organization in Austin that commissions monumental works of art as gifts to the city. He is the recipient of the Texas Book Festival’s Texas Writers Award, the Lon Tinkle Award for lifetime achievement from the Texas Institute of Letters, and has been inducted into the Texas Literary Hall of Fame. Stephen Harrigan and his wife Sue Ellen have three daughters and four grandchildren.


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Carolina Quiroga-Stultz

Carolina Quiroga-Stultz
Carolina Quiroga-Stultz 

Carolina Quiroga-Stultz is a Colombian storyteller and teacher artist.Since her arrival in the United States, she has performed in many regional festivals in East Tennessee, Texas, Kansas City, and Costa Rica; has been guest storyteller for numerous colleges, schools, libraries, cultural centers, theaters, and clubs; and has told stories at different multicultural events, with audiences from Africa, Asia, and Latin America . Most recently, Carolina was a featured storyteller at the 2017 Texas Storytelling Festival in Denton.

Her work is devoted to improving the understanding of all Latin American cultures through bilingual storytelling performances.Her large repertoire of stories explores Latin American and Hispanic myths, legends, mysteries, and historical events ranging from Mexico to La Patagonia.Her bilingual storytelling enchants her audiences with her compelling mannerisms, research, and the passion she brings into each story.

Carolina holds a Master of Arts in Reading with a concentration in Storytelling from East Tennessee State University.She is a Wolf Trap Early Learning teacher artist in San Antonio and the 2016 J. J. Reneaux Emerging Artist Grant recipient.

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Taylor Tomlin

Taylor Tomlin
Taylor Tomlin 
BIO Forthcoming.
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Bill Wittliff

Bill Wittliff
Bill Wittliff 
Bill Wittliff was born in Taft, a small town in south Texas, in 1940. After his parents divorced, he and his brother Jim moved with their mother to Gregory, Texas, where Mrs. Wittliff ran a small telephone office during World War II (these experiences provided the basis for "Raggedy Man," Wittliff's feature film). Later, when his mother remarried, the family moved to a ranch in Blanco, a rural community of 700 in the hill country of central Texas.

In 1964, shortly after graduating from the University of Texas, Wittliff, with his wife Sally, founded a book publishing company, The Encino Press, which specialized in regional material about Texas and the Southwest. To date, Encino has won over 100 awards for quality of design and content. The press operated out of a 19th-century Victorian house in Austin in which O. Henry once lived and wrote

An accomplished photographer, Wittliff's photographs documenting the life of the Mexican vaquero (taken 1969-71) have been exhibited in numerous galleries and institutions throughout this country and in Mexico, including the National Cowboy Hall of Fame, the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City, and the Texas Capitol. In Japan, they represented the United States during its bicentennial year. After twenty years, the exhibit is still shown as a traveling display in the U. S. and Mexico under the auspices of the Institute of Texan Cultures.

At 29, Wittliff was elected to the Texas Institute of Letters. He served as president during 1974-78, and sat on the Executive Council until 1990. In 1993, he was elected Fellow of the the Institute. He is a member of the historic Texas Philosophical Society, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences; and he served for six years on the Executive Board of Trustees of Robert Redford's Sundance Institute.

In 1985, with the donation of their lifelong collection of original manuscripts and books, Bill and Sally founded the Southwestern Writers Collection at Southwest Texas State University. Since that time the collection has grown rapidly, supported by donors from all over the country. It features original manuscripts by J. Frank Dobie, John Graves, Larry McMurtry, Walter Prescott Webb, Bud Shrake, Larry L. King, Horton Foote, Preston Jones, Sam Shepard, Willie Nelson, and many others. It also includes paintings by numerous regional artists including William Lester, Tom Lea, John Groth, Jerry Bywaters, Kermit Oliver, Robert Wade. Expanding the scope of the current facility, in 1996 the Wittliffs endowed the Wittliff Gallery of Southwestern & Mexican Photography which already includes works by Russell Lee, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Ansel Adams, Keith Carter, Henri Cartier Bresson, Lola Bravo, Laura Gilpin, Edward Weston, Graciela Iturbide, Edward Curtis, Nacho Lopez, Erwin E. Smith, Marco Antonio Cruz, Jim Bones, Paul Strand, Mariana Yampolsky, and many others. Both collections are housed in eight specially designed rooms and a large, chambered gallery on the top floor of the Albert B. Alkek Library on the university campus.

Wittliff started sending ideas to the best television dramas of that era- Kraft Television Theatre, Playhouse 90, Robert Montgomery Presents.
Bill Wittliff had never seen a screenplay when he sat down in the early seventies to start writing a movie based on a story his grandfather had told him years before. He didn't use an outline; he simply wrote down whatever came to him next. Within a month he had a screenplay. Bud Shrake saw it sitting on Wittliff's desk, read it, and asked if he could show it to his agent. The script eventually was given to the producers of The French Connection, who loved it, and a few years later it appeared as Barbarosa. Starring Willie Nelson as a onetime outlaw hunted down by a vengeful family, it was highly praised.
One Christmas when he was in high school, Wittliff received a present from his aunt who lived in Houston. It was J. Frank Dobie's Tales of Old-Time Texas, a folklore collection. In the book was a story titled "The Wild Woman of the Navidad," about a runaway slave whose footprints were often seen in the settlements along the river. Wittliff realized that this was the same story he had heard the hardware store owner tell years before. "The book absolutely set me on fire," he says.

Perhaps his biggest claim to fame during his university days was the horseshoe-shaped bar he built in his room at the Kappa Sigma fraternity house. At night, he and his roommate would turn the room into a gambling den, where Wittliff won most of the poker games and sold cheap Scotch that he had poured into empty Chivas Regal bottles. Among the regular visitors to his gambling den, he says, was Frank Erwin, who was the fraternity's legal adviser and later became the chairman of UT's board of regents.
Bill Wittliff wrote one movie based on his mother's life as a telephone operator ( Raggedy Man, starring Sissy Spacek), another about the life of country musicians on the road ( Honeysuckle Rose, again starring Willie Nelson), and a third about a family nearly losing its farm ( Country, starring Jessica Lange and Sam Shepard).
Wittliff submitted an article for its column My Most Unforgettable Character. The story, entirely invented by Wittliff, was about his close relationship with Lyndon Johnson, then a U.S. senator, who had a ranch near Blanco. When that article was rejected, he sent several made-up quotes-which he claimed he had heard LBJ say-to the Quotable Quotes section. Reader's Digest turned him down again.

Bill Wittliff wrote the screenplay for Lonesome Dove and suddenly found himself on Hollywood's rarefied A-list, being offered eyeball-popping amounts of money to move to Los Angeles and work on movies or television series. Yet he refused to leave Texas.
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Stan Mahler

Stan Mahler
Stan Mahler 
Stan Mahler was born in Haskell, Texas and now living in Olney, Texas, . He has performed his music from the Big Bend country to the corners of Texas and New Mexico. He also a member of the Western Music Association, Academy of Western Music and the Cowtown Opry located in the historic Fort Worth Stockyards in Fort Worth, Texas. Stan has shared the stage with western artists like Leon Rausch, Don Edwards, Waddie Mitchell, R.J.Vandygriff, R. W. Hampton, Dan Roberts, Jeff Gore, Royce Smithey, Judy James, and let's not forget Devon Dawson, the Outlaw Jessie Robertson. Cowboy and cowgirl poets, Lanny Joe Burnett , Teresa Burleson and Chris Isaacs. Stan's powerful tenor voice and yodeling talent makes him a sure fire hit with every audience as he sings about the history and lifestyle of the West.
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Items

Dobie Dichos - Meal & Program - 12 & under
Nov 03, 2017 | 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM $7.00
11/3/17 - 6pm - 9:30pm
Dobie Dichos - Meal & Program - Adult
$15.00
11/3/17 - 6pm - 9:30pm
Dobie Dichos - Program Only - 12 & Under
$5.00
11/3/17 - 6pm - 9:30pm
Dobie Dichos - Program Only - Adult
$10.00
11/3/17 - 6pm - 9:30pm

Sponsors

Historic Oakville 1856 jailhouse Inn
Texas Folklore Society
Beeville Publishing Co., Inc.
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